COM12: Week 1

REVIEW QUESTIONS 7.1

  1. What are the three groups of personal capabilities (Goleman 1996) that drive outstanding performance within an organisation?
  2. List the emotional intelligence leadership skills.
  3. Briefly discuss the functions performed by leaders.
  4. Identify five types of power leaders can draw on.
  5. What are the two extreme approaches leaders may take to motivation?
  6. List typical characteristics of motivation in organisations.

 

What are the three groups of personal capabilities (Goleman 1996) that drive outstanding performance within an organisation?

Communication, Emotional Intelligence (EI), Cognitive Intelligence (IQ).

List the emotional intelligence leadership skills.

“Emotional intelligence leadership skills include self-awareness, openness to criticism, ability to manage emotions, motivation, self-confidence, honesty and integrity, courage and ability to develop others.”

Dwyer. Communication for Business and the Professions: Strategie s and Skills, 5th Edition. Pearson/Australia, 2012-10-15. VitalBook file.

Briefly discuss the functions performed by leaders.

Leaders establish group direction, align people to group activities and tasks, and build coalitions within and outside the organisation. Functions fulfilled by a leader include:

  • communication building
  • role clarification and effective execution of tasks
  • motivation of the group to achieve goals and objectives
  • development of group cohesiveness and the right climate for achievement
  • dealing with unexpected developments, consulting with and counselling followers
  • communication within the group, and between the group and the rest of the organisation.

Identify five types of power leaders can draw on.

Legitimate power, held because the organisation has given power and authority to the position held by
the leader.

Reward power, held because the leader has the opportunity, through the control of resources, either to
give or withhold things wanted by others—the leader can use reward power well to reinforce effective
behaviour, or badly to manipulate the behaviour of others.

Coercive power, held when a leader compels others to behave in a certain way—followers may become
resentful and do only the minimum to get by.

Expertise power, held because of the leader’s knowledge, aptitude and ability—others are willing to
defer to expertise power.

Referent power, from being respected, admired, liked or personally identified with by others—group
members are motivated and follow directions willingly.

What are the two extreme approaches leaders may take to motivation?

task and job-centred, or people and employee-centred

List typical characteristics of motivation in organisations.

High performance vs Apathy
Consistent results vs indifference
Energy, enthusiasm, determination vs High absenteeism
Cooperation vs Lack of cooperation
Willingness to accept responsibility vs Unjustified resistance to change

 

DB Post

Leadership is a form of masterful manipulation of others to achieve a goal via effective communication and motivation.

DB Response

Young-Ae Turner wrote:
Leadership is the ability to influence hearts and minds in order to achieve a desired outcome.  It’s about being able to demonstrate effective communication, technical or adaptive thinking (or sometimes both) and believing in shared values which creates a strong foundation for trust. From my own personal experience good leaders possess mindfulness, the ability to motivate and inspire individuals or groups and they lead by example.

My response:

Hi Young-Ae,

I particularly liked your use of the word “mindfulness” as I believe this highlights the importance of a leader’s Emotional Quotient (EQ) or EI as mentioned in our text book. The ability to empathise, and emotionally connect with followers allows for building rapport and trust (which you previously alluded to) and this is the kernel that bonds a group cohesively.

 

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